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4 Things Churches Need to Stop Posting on Social Media

4 Things Churches Need to Stop Posting on Social Media

Posted February 4, 2019 by Robert Carnes

There are plenty of blog posts out there about what churches and Christians should be posting on their social media. There’s no shortage of ideas for what to add online.

It’s gotten to the point where we feel like we have to post everything. Every thought. Every observation. Every opinion.

If FOMO is the fear of missing out on what other people are doing, then FOBI is the fear of being ignored. In other words, we subconsciously want other people to know that we’re doing stuff.

But we need to be more conscious of what we should refrain from posting. Not just because posting everything adds to content overload. But also because what we post to social media impacts how people see us. What we share can have real consequences.

So here are a few things you and your church should stop publishing online.
 

1. Stuff No One Cares About

This should be obvious. But judging by the large amount of stuff online that no one cares about, this isn’t obvious enough. So I’ll say it again. Don’t post stuff no one cares about.

This isn’t just the Instagram photos of your breakfast. It’s also the church events for seniors—if they’re not online, they probably won’t see it there.

Know who your audience is. Know what they care about. And post that stuff. Don’t just share things that add value to your church. Share things that add value to others.
 

2. Crossposts

You’ve probably seen these posts before. A tweet that’s just a link from Instagram. Or a Facebook post that cuts off in the middle, only to link you back to Twitter. This is called cross-posting and it’s annoying.

It’s tempting for churches to cross post because it’s easy—just link the two accounts together and let them auto-post. It’s tempting for churches because most don’t have many people to manage their social accounts manually. It’s just much easier to set it on auto-pilot.

But they’re just not effective because they expose the lack of effort. They aren’t effective because they ignore the differences in social media platforms.
 

3. Political Opinions

No matter where you land on the political spectrum, it’s just not a good idea to post political opinions on social media. It wasn’t a good idea anytime, but it’s especially dangerous in this current political climate.

People aren’t looking to the church for political commentary. Even if we do need some wisdom on who to vote for, that advice shouldn’t come online—it needs to come in person, with someone you already trust and have a relationship with.

Adding more voices into the chaotic political atmosphere doesn’t help anyone—it only serves to corrode your church’s influence. What we need to do instead is provide a positive message. That’s something sorely lacking on social media. Real wisdom stands out from the chaos.
 

4. Empty Prayers

As tragedies and disasters have become more visible online, it’s become popular to post #PrayForFillinTheBlank. These type of posts seem to come more often. And each one has less impact than the last one.

But we should stop these kind of posts. Not because the sentiment isn’t nice. But because it starts to feel meaningless. We’ve started to convince ourselves that posting to social media actually does something. We pat ourselves on the back and don’t do anything to fix the problem.

Here’s what we should do instead. Actually pray for those tragedies. Figure out what you can do to help. Share online what action steps people can take to help. Then post pictures of those people actually helping.


What should your church stop posting on social media?

 

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Filed under: Social Media

About the Author

Robert Carnes

Robert Carnes is a writer and storyteller. He's the author of The Original Storyteller: Become a Better Storyteller in 30 Days and works as a managing editor at the Orange Group in Atlanta.

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Comments (6)

  • Heather M Day
    9:35 AM
    Mon, Feb 4, 2019

    Thanks for the insight!

    The “stuff no one cares about” is tricky, though. Just because you don’t care about it, doesn’t mean other people don’t.  Seniors ARE online.  The 65+ crowd is one of the fastest growing group on Facebook. If you ignore their needs, you’re ignoring a huge chunk of the Church.

  • Drew
    11:24 AM
    Mon, Feb 4, 2019

    I agree with Heather.  Seniors are online; Facebook is how they keep up with their kids and grandkids.  I’ve also seen kids and grandkids checking out their grandparents on our church’s Facebook page.

  • Jane Harris
    4:38 PM
    Mon, Feb 4, 2019

    I also agree with Heather and Drew - a large percentage of the Seniors (65+) in our church are online and on Facebook. As a matter of fact, Facebook is probably one of the quickest ways for me to reach that age group.

  • Sylvia
    8:07 PM
    Mon, Feb 4, 2019

    Well said Heather! That’s the first thing I thought too! And all but one of our seniors at church is “on line”.
    Be careful, caring for others and not being dismissive is one of the most important things we need to convey on our social media.

  • Bryan Haley
    6:58 AM
    Tue, Feb 5, 2019

    You are all right—seniors are increasingly online. By focusing on that example, though, you’re missing Robert’s point. His statement says “if” seniors aren’t online, then posting about the senior event is not going to reach them. In other words, you need to know your audience, and how to best reach them.

  • Heather M Day
    1:09 PM
    Tue, Feb 5, 2019

    Thanks Bryan! That makes sense.  I just know this is a common mistaken assumption, so I thought it worth mentioning.  We just emailed a 93 year old this week—at his request—and he edited and emailed us all the documents we needed immediately. More often than not, today’s seniors are pretty techno savvy.

    And again, overall this article is really good stuff. Just responded in the interest of sparking discussion. smile

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