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Stop Controlling Everything

Stop Controlling Everything

Posted February 27, 2018 by Bryan Haley

I’m a control freak. I’m an A-type personality. Usually, I’m okay with that. And for the record, chances are you’re probably a control freak, too. It’s a well-known personality trait of “communication types.” Most church administrators might call themselves “detail oriented,” but in reality, they’re type-A personalities who like to sweat the small stuff. Most communication directors like to think they’re “process oriented” but that’s just code for they “can’t leave anything to chance.”

The problem is: It’s not healthy to control everything. Paul talks to the believers at Corinth about unity and diversity within the church. He addresses this unified, and yet diverse group as the “body of Christ.” You know what that means? The Church is not a one-man (or woman) show. As Christians, we’re meant to rely on each other in all we do.
 

Know Your Weaknesses

Face it: It’s not possible to be “the expert” at everything. When we try to control everything, our weaknesses actually become more obvious—and sometimes this can lead to more failure than necessary. But when you know which skills and talents you struggle with, you can find people who have those strengths and surround yourself with them. It’s okay to have people on your team who are better than you at one or even more skillsets. In fact, great leaders hire people who are better than them at the specific role they’re hiring for.
 

Build a Team

Controlling every detail means you’re probably carrying a pretty big burden. You don’t need to. When you stop controlling everything, you free yourself up to build a team of people who can help you complete the project, or just communicate better in the long run. Pick your adage:

  • “More hands make light work.”
  • “Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much”
  • “None of us is as smart as all of us.”
  • And of course, Galatians 6:2, "Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ.”
     

The Great Commission is Worth It

In communication, we’re helping our ministries fulfill the great commission. We’re making it easier for each person in the church to make disciples of Jesus. Jesus invites us to take part his Great Commission. Likewise, you should invite others to take part in your small section of The Church’s mission. Sometimes that means that the quality of every promotion, campaign, or bulletin announcement may not be to your standards. Sometimes people will fail you. But most of the time, your willingness to delegate will allow for more ministry to be done, better, by the people whose heart is passionate about the work. Sometimes, you may think “I should just do this myself.” But don’t. Instead, use that design piece with Comic Sans as an opportunity to teach a volunteer about basic typography. Or use the moment when someone doesn’t show up as a teaching opportunity about their role in the vision of the church.

 

The bottom line: I’m not as awesome as I’d like to think I am. And neither are you. Good thing it’s not about us.

Filed under: Branding, Mission and Vision, Communications, Leadership

About the Author

Bryan Haley

Bryan joined the ReFrame Media team in 2017 with a passion to help churches reach people with the gospel using effective church communications. As producer for Church Juice, Bryan helps congregations energize their church communications by overseeing the Church Juice blog, publishing in-depth ebook resources, and developing training on topics like marketing, branding, social media, internal communications, and website development.

Bryan brings years of communication and outreach experience gained both in full-time church ministry and the field of church website design. Bryan and his wife, Denae, enjoy Michigan summers, Detroit sports, and family time.

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Comments (2)

  • David Bacon
    9:51 AM
    Tue, Feb 27, 2018

    Great post! And I always love a humorous reference to Comic Sans!

  • Stan Squires
    10:05 AM
    Tue, Feb 27, 2018

    Interesting as this issue is key one. A Minister’s emphasis could be on the spiritual, whereas the lay (communications) volunteer is emphasising the “community missional work”. Two totally different approaches to the same event that they are promoting. Many in the community do not wish to be buried in the spiritual, but do wish to live the 10 Commandments.

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