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Mother’s Day Planning for Your Church

Mother’s Day Planning for Your Church

Posted April 26, 2016 by Jerod Clark

Research shows Mother’s Day is the third highest church attendance day across the U.S. While Easter and Christmas often monopolize your planning efforts, research from LifeWay suggests you need to be intentional about preparing your Mother’s Day service as well. 

The idea that Mother’s Day church attendance is so high makes sense. With the likelihood of more family members in town, many families want to honor mom by going to church as a group. Plus, the programing itself is often affirming to moms.

So, as Mother’s Day weekend approaches, here are some ideas to consider.

Share your gratefulness for moms. If research shows moms are getting more people to church, isn’t that enough of a reason to say thanks? There is an expectation that your service will include something special for mothers. Whether it is the music, message, kid’s performances or anything else, keep women in mind as you plan worship.

Acknowledge that not all women are mothers. A woman’s worth is not tied to being a mother. My wife and I don’t have kids. We have friends who can’t get pregnant or have lost children as well. If that’s the experience in my life, I’m sure it’s the case in your congregation. While it’s right to honor mothers, it’s important to bless and recognize the other women in your church too. If you don’t, you’ve alienated a sizable part of your congregation.

Realize some family relationships are difficult. The mention of a mother can bring up a range of emotions. Many will have fond, happy memories. But others might be grieving a loss, saddened over an illness or still angry because of past problems. How your church addresses these varying realities communicates a lot about what kind of community you are and how you provide guidance for healing.

Cast your vision. High attendance weekends are a perfect chance to spend a little extra time to compellingly share what you stand for as a church. Give examples of the work you’re doing. Share a story of a changed life. Show how women are an important part of your serving community. No one in your sanctuary should leave wondering why your church exists. This is especially important when you think about the visitors who find church to be unfamiliar or a place they haven’t attended in years.

Make next steps clear. Great vision leads people to take action. Make sure you’re intentional about sharing how people can get more deeply connected with your church. Mother’s Day is a prime time to kick-off a welcome class, launch a new women’s ministry initiative or make a push for ladies to serve in their congregation.

Filed under: Branding, Mission and Vision, Visitor's Perspective, Communications, Holidays

About the Author

Jerod Clark

Jerod joined ReFrame Media in 2007 and built Church Juice from scratch. He poured all his passion for branding, marketing, and messaging into the ministry, publishing e-books, blog posts, and speaking at conferences to help churches energize their communications. He also served as ReFrame’s in-house graphic designer. Before beginning his work at Church Juice, Jerod was a local TV news reporter. In 2016, Jerod stepped away from the ministry to pursue interests in marketing and communications on new horizons.

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